Featured: Conversation with MensHealth.com

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MensHealth.com’s Kasey Panetta recently caught up with me to poke my brain about social media and how it can be effective in searching for your next gig. I wanted to be clear in that optimizing social search is simple and puts the job search, CEO, and hiring managers at your fingertips. Kasey also called upon a few others with social savvy to weigh in on the topic.

Tweet Your Way to Your Dream Job

by Kasey Panetta

“just got a new suit. who wants 2 #hireme?”

Twitter may sometimes seem like a 140-character cesspool of celebrity gossip and teenage angst, but, if used correctly, it can be a killer job-hunting tool.

Just ask Jerry Rizzo, Social Media Coordinator for the Philadelphia 76ers, who used Twitter to make the connections to land his dream gig. When the Sixers—home of our favorite Men’s Health intern, Evan Turner—launched a contest to choose the team’s new mascot, Rizzo registered Twitter accounts for two of the final suggestions, @PhilEMoose and@BFranklinDogg, and started tweeting. Impressed with Rizzo’s entrepreneurial efforts, Sixers brass soon offered the amateur a plum social media job.

And Rizzo isn’t the only one using the site for a career boost: There were nearly 300 million mentions of jobs, job openings, and hiring opportunities on Twitter in 2012, according to the company.

But like any job search, tweeting for employment is still a daunting task. So we enlisted the help of top career experts to come up with this 7-step plan to get you from @yourcouch to @thecorneroffice.

Step 1: Pick the Right Handle and Headshot
Create a handle that is reflective of who you are, but also professional, says Rich DeMatteo, co-founder of Bad Rhino, Inc., a Philadelphia-based social media marketing agency. It’s probably easiest to use your name—particularly if you’re in a more traditional field—but if you’re trying to brand yourself, tie it into your blog title or company name. As for the picture, a simple headshot (it doesn’t have to be professional) is best.

Step 2: Fill Your 160-Character Profile
Keep it memorable yet professional, and avoid long sentences, says DeMatteo. Make sure what you say makes sense for the industry and company you want to work for. For example, if you’re looking to work in accounting, be a little more formal.  Try “I’m John Smith. I have a CPA from XX University.” and link to your LinkedIn.  If you’re in graphic design, be a little quirky.  Try “John. Social Media. Peanut Butter and Banana Sandwiches.” with a link to your portfolio. Most importantly? Be transparent, says DeMatteo. You want to sound the way you actually are.

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What Google+ Circles Mean to Us by Jerry Rizzo

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Do Google+ circles have your head spinning in circles? Having trouble deciding whose in and whose out?  Have no fear, I’m here to hopefully quell your Stokenphobia.

Sto·ken·pho·bi·a/ˈfōbēə/ Noun: An extreme or irrational fear of or aversion to round objects.

It’s easy enough to continue Facebook style categorizing and adding every user to your “Friends” circle.  By solely using a “Friends” circle you are essentially implying that you don’t care who sees your posts and you don’t care whose posts you see.  There is no harm in this categorizing method, but you may miss out on lots of opportunities to engage interested users.

 

If you want your posts to be read and you want to tailor your feed to your interest you must be a little more selective.  This may seem daunting, but it’s important to remember that the G+ experience is all about YOU!  When you are faced with the decision of which of your circles another user belongs to ask yourself the following questions:

  • What kind of content does this user share?
  • Do I want to read this users content regularly?
  • What kind of content do I want to share with this user?
  • Does this user have an interest in what I’m posting about?
  • How often does this user post?
Most importantly, I advise against becoming overly consumed by determining whether somebody is a friend , acquaintance or random.  It’s okay if you find that most users end up stock piled into one circle, because let’s face it many users are still new to Google+ and are not frequently sharing interesting content yet.  Ultimately it’s about the content being shared and if YOU want to share or be shared with.

Hopefully the room has stopped spinning and you can now create more appropriate circles to create a more favorable G+ experience.